E&O: Statistics in the Criminal Justice System Workshop: March 24, 2018

Location

This workshop took place at the Mary M. Townes Science Complex on the campus of North Carolina Central University (NCCU), Durham, NC.

Description

This one-day science and math workshop for undergraduate students focused on how applied mathematics and statistics are used in the field of forensic science. This workshop was held, in partnership with the NCCU Mathematics and Physics Department, in order to encourage underrepresented groups to pursue careers in statistics, mathematics and data science.

The workshop featured keynote speaker, Kristian Lum, Lead Statistician of the Human Rights Data Analysis Group. Lum analyzed the association between modern methods of algorithmic policing and racial bias in forensic investigation. David Banks, Director of SAMSI and a Professor of the Practice of Statistics at Duke University also gave a short talk on his experience as an expert witness in the trial of Sheriff Terry Johnson, of Alamance County, who was accused of discrimination against Hispanics. The workshop also featured hands on familiarization with common software in the fields of applied mathematics and statistics to capture data. Students also learned first hand from other young professionals, currently pursuing science and math careers, about their experiences and got tips and techniques for success.

Schedule and Supporting Media

Printable Schedule
Poster

Saturday, March 24, 2018
Mary M. Townes Science Complex, NCCU

Description Speaker Slides
Opening Remarks and Welcome Elvan Ceyhan, SAMSI Deputy Director
Keynote: The Problem with Predictive Policing Kristian Lum, Human Rights Data Analysis Group (HRDAG)
Introduction to ‘R’ Software Yawen Guan, SAMSI Postdoc

The Discrimination Trial of Sheriff Johnson of Alamance County David Banks, SAMSI Director

Graduate Experiences in STEM PANEL: Michael Akande, Duke University
Jonathan Bryan, Duke University
Maggie Johnson, SAMSI Postdoc
Joseph Marion, Duke University
Hands on Data Experience with ‘R’ Software Mikael Kuusela and Huang Huang, SAMSI Postdocs

Closing Remarks Alade Tokuta, NCCU

Questions: email eceyhan@samsi.info